Thursday, February 14, 2008

Quiet Beibei


你们好!
.
My last few days have been diverse and relaxing: Supermarket (超级市场) shopping and cooking (none of my favorite Chinese dish or noddle (餐馆) restaurants are open due to the Spring Festival (春节) vacation), attempting to piece together a music(音乐)/poetry (诗) unit for this upcoming semester (more on this as the semester materializes), a trip here and there to Chongqing (重庆) to see Devon and Nick and eat delicious sushi (寿司) and peruse the English language bookstores (书店), and my favorite part of the day, my post-dinner nightly walk through campus with some Chinese sweet bread (面包), my camera (照相机) and my Ipod (translated as "MP3" ha!).
.
As mentioned in previous posts, I feel blessed to have such a beautiful, large campus. Roughly the same size as my alma mater, SUNY Fredonia, there are enough trails, hills, ponds, and trees to keep me visually stimulated for hours. It's quiet now at Southwest University. I can probably walk for an hour and pass only a handful of people, mostly students who couldn't find/afford a bus/train to celebrate Spring Festival in their hometown with their families. It's a good time to think and process, remember old friends and memories, and, with the help of my Ipod, place myself back in America, temporarily of course, and analyze how much my life has changed in the last 8 months and equally, how much life is/can be strikingly similar.
.
I snap pictures of some of the interesting sights along those walks. You can see them under the TAG: QuietBeibei.
.
I have also resubmerged myself into the world of current events, reading everything the Chinese Internet F i r e w a l l will allow. China's Only English Language Newspaper, The China Daily, is interesting (and kinda funny, comparatively-speaking), and only slightly more pessimistic than CCTV9, which is (seriously) the Chinese Utopian News Network. I seriously feel good inside after I watch it! Serene, ambient music, slideshows of beautiful sceneries around China and giggling children. But then return to The New York Times and CNN.com and come back to reality: school shooting in Illionis, attempted assassination in East Timor, Iraqie suicide bombers, and the (sometimes) farcical race for the White House. China and the Olympics are a hot topic on these American new sources as well, and not always presented with beaming rays of excitment and anticipation. I will spare you my public opinions on these latest developments, but encourage you to research and form your own opinion on the famed-director of E.T. and his involvment (or lack thereof) with the Summer Games... (Philiprazem@gmail.com) Oh, and this is by far the greatest/strangest article about China in the my last 8 months in the Middle Kingdom (click). Oh, Mao...
.
I love and miss you all,
.
Phil

No comments: